What Do the Taliban Believe and Will Women Face Their Wrath?

Photo by ‏🌸🙌 أخٌ‌في‌الله on Unsplash

A return to Islamic shariah law would be disastrous for Afghani women

“If they lived in Saudi Arabia, under Shari’a law, these college girls in their pretty scarves wouldn’t be free to study, to work, to drive, to walk around. In Saudi Arabia girls their age and younger are confined, are forced to marry, and if they have sex outside of marriage they are sentenced to prison and flogged. According to the Quran, their husband is permitted to beat them and decide whether they may work or even leave the house; he may marry other women without seeking their approval, and if he chooses to divorce them, they have no right to resist or to keep custody of their children. Doesn’t this matter at all to these clever young Muslim girls in America?”
Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Nomad: From Islam to America: A Personal Journey Through the Clash of Civilizations

The Taliban previously ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001 and imposed a strict form of Islamic law on the country.

Not only were there many civil rights abuses, they also were a harbor for many terrorist organizations, including Bin Laden and al-Qaeda.

Now that they have almost complete control of the country, what is in store for Afghanistan and especially its women and girls?

What is Sharia Law?

The Taliban ruled according to a strict interpretation of Islamic Shariah law.

Public executions and floggings were common, and women were mostly barred from working or studying and forced to wear an all-covering burqa in public.

The Taliban banned Western books and films and destroyed cultural artifacts from other traditions, including 1,500-year-old giant statues of the Buddha in the central Bamiyan valley.

Education for women and girls was forbidden under almost all circumstances, and women (except for select, approved female doctors) were not allowed to work outside of the home or even leave the house without a male guardian.

And All forms of entertainment were banned for everyone: music, television, socializing between sexes outside the family, make-up, and kite-flying.

  • • Theft is punishable by amputation of the hands (Quran 5:38).
  • • Criticizing or denying any part of the Quran is punishable by death.
  • • Criticizing Muhammad or denying that he is a prophet is punishable by death.
  • • Criticizing or denying Allah is punishable by death (see Allah moon god).
  • • A Muslim who becomes a non-Muslim is punishable by death (See Compulsion).
  • • A non-Muslim who leads a Muslim away from Islam is punishable by death.
  • • A non-Muslim man who marries a Muslim woman is punishable by death.
  • • A woman or girl who has been raped cannot testify in court against her rapist(s).
  • • Testimonies of 4 male witnesses are required to prove the rape of a female (Quran 24:13).
  • • A woman or girl who alleges rape without producing 4 male witnesses is guilty of adultery.
  • • A woman or girl found guilty of adultery is punishable by death (see "Islamophobia").
  • • A male convicted of rape can have his conviction dismissed by marrying his victim.
  • • Muslim men have sexual rights to any woman/girl not wearing the Hijab (see Taharrush).
  • • A woman can have 1 husband, who can have up to 4 wives; Muhammad can have more.
  • • A man can marry an infant girl and consummate the marriage when she is 9 years old.
  • • Girls' clitoris should be cut (Muhammad's words, Book 41, Kitab Al-Adab, Hadith 5251).
  • • A man can beat his wife for insubordination (see Quran 4:34 and Religion of Peace).
  • • A man can unilaterally divorce his wife; a wife needs her husband's consent to divorce.
  • • A divorced wife loses custody of all children over 6 years of age or when they exceed it.
  • • A woman's testimony in court, allowed in property cases, carries ½ the weight of a man's.
  • • A female heir inherits half of what a male heir inherits (see Mathematics in Quran).
  • • A woman cannot speak alone to a man who is not her husband or relative.
  • • Meat to eat must come from animals that have been sacrificed to Allah - i.e., be "Halal."
  • • Muslims should engage in Taqiyya and lie to non-Muslims to advance Islam.
  • Continue...

What has happened in the past?

During the Taliban’s last rule, public floggings and executions, including stoning for accusations of adultery, were carried out in city squares and stadiums.

They had a harsh interpretation of the Quran and enforced it with brutal public punishments, including amputations and mass executions.

They also made clear that rival religious practices would not be tolerated.

What may happen in the future?

A spokesman said the Taliban would grant a "blanket amnesty" for all in Afghanistan, including members of the Afghan military and interpreters.

Promises have been made that would continue to allow Afghan women their freedom to study and work outside the home.

But it already seems there may be a disconnect between what they are saying and what is already happening in the streets.

Militants have opened the doors of the prisons and released thousands of prisoners, sent women home from work, and removed girls from schools.

In the advance toward the capital, forces have destroyed medical facilities, killed civilians, and left thousands of Afghans displaced.

Some even claim that the Taliban has demanded that women from the villages it conquers marry its unwed fighters.

Takeaways

If their past behavior and rule is any indication of the future, women in Afghanistan are in for a very rocky road.

Only time will tell and our thoughts and prayers are with everyone still in Country trying to get out and for all who remain.


** Sharia Law Exerpts Courtesy of Christianity And Islam

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Randy Salars

Randy Salars

Copywriter and marketing consultant. Author of ‘Stories And Recipes From The Soup Kitchen.’ Freedom lover, adventurer, and treasure hunter.
Silver City, NM, USA